Salad Unlimited

This site was launched this morning, and I have been receiving some very good comments already. Thank you so much to all of you that have taken the time to comment to make my blog better.

My growing have been going on for quite a while now and although my squash plants had never gotten any pollination because of the weather, one vegetable I have been able to enjoy (fresh from the garden) is my endive and red lettuce leaves.

The other night, we had a dinner of BBQ steak bought from the market but we have also been able to sample the lettuce grown hydrologically on my balcony. Of course the plants were not mature enough to be harvested as a whole head of lettuce, but it didn’t stop us from cutting one leave from each plant to make a nice big bowl of salad. Toss them with balsamic vinegar and our own basil olive oil, it’s a dynamic green salad to go with grilled steaks.

Think about this, the lettuce will continue to grow but we can just pick a leaf off everyday to make our salad. My supply will definitely be limitless.

By the way the taste was superb (really blowing my own trumpets here) and what can be crisper and fresher than leaves picked from the plant and served on the plate in a matter of minutes?

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Launch of New Site

Today is the launch of this new site for the slow food and slow farming experience. I call this my “Really Slow Cottage” experience.

In the recent issue of Sai Kung Magazine a reader was fretting that there isn’t much written material available in Hong Kong for growing and gardening that takes into consideration of the local climate.

Well, you would have read from my post couple of weeks ago that the weather was really in extreme in Hong Kong and how can one plan for sewing the seeds and growing by reading books and magazine that were written for European or American climate.

Plus, where do you go to find seeds that you are looking for and what soil or medium is best to grow what kind of vegetable. Where can you get your own bag of horse manure? What and how to compost in an urban environment without upsetting you neighbours.

I hope you will find answers to your question here, however, if I haven’t cover what you are looking for yet please feel free to drop me an email. Happy reading!

“Move Earth” Says the Chinese Almanac

The Chinese Almanac, which our agricultural ancestors had use throughout the last two thousand years to give advice about planting, has indicated the last two days would be auspicious days for “moving earth” and “start trading”. It’s so happened that these are the wettest days of the month, up to 95% humidity, and you can almost swim in the air. The plants are surviving the dampness, but they do need the sun to expose itself otherwise they will suffocate and die. This is the time I really believe an indoor garden is better for the growing then the outdoor ones. With my portable growing boxes, this is exactly what I will do and taking some of the plants indoor to the warmer and dryer atmosphere to let them have some air.

Endiveplants grown in different media.

The endive that I have transplanted about 4 weeks ago from seedlings are doing fine. The ones that are growing in perlite (珍珠岩) are growing at least 30% biggest than the ones I have planted in compost alone or half compost and half perlite. For this batch of plants I am growing them in a HypoNex high-grade solution that is diluted 1,000 times. I use the measuring cap supplied and used only half of the small cap and dissolve the nutrient in a 2 litre bottle that was recycled from used orange juice container. The nutrient is changes every week or so and the boxes that contain the nutrient are scrubbed and washed with dishwashing liquid.

Living outside the urban area is actually more challenging with the growing environment as there are more insects and pests to deal with on a day-to-day basis. This morning I’ve found a couple of fat green caterpillars munching on my Choi Sum leaves. They are promptly deported to our neighbour’s plot. Well, they don’t really grow anything there so it’s no harm for the green friends to have some dust for breakfast.

So, to follow the suggestion of the almanac, I thought I should plant some seeds to mark the wettest days of the month, or the year, who knows?

What is this post?

New addition to this blog is to keep a journal on how to build an edible garden in Hong Kong and Macau. Be it a window box, a balcony, a kitchen counter or a backyard lot, oh, and hydroponics too.

To write about the red wine, or the white wine for that effect, culture in China.

Where to go, what to buy and how to enjoy.

To meet new faces, old vintage and enjoy the conversation.